“The Safest Poem”

In such cases as these, the safest poem to write
is a poem that is aimless and digressive,
such as a poem about lechon.
On the first platter, there was the spicy lechon,
and on the second platter, there was the regular lechon.

Both platters were equal in weight —
maybe one-half or three-fourth kilo each.
Of course, there were other dishes on the table, too,
like baked scallops, ngohiong, and adobong kang-kong,
but the star of this particular poem is the lechon.

Or it may be that the safest poem to write
is a poem about warm brownie cups.
On some of the cups, there were the regular brownie cups —
white brownie topped with vanilla ice cream —
and on the other cups, there were the flavored brownie cups.

Of course, there were other items on the table, too,
such as teaspoons, table napkins, and perhaps a bottle of water,
but the star of this particular poem is the warm brownie cup.
Or it may be that the safest poem to write
is a poem about wines.

The first bottle was a red wine which contained 7% alcohol,
and the second bottle was a white wine which contained only 5% alcohol.
Both bottles were uncorked and submerged in a bucket of ice-cold water.
Of course, there were other things on the table, too;
for instance, bread and pastries; crispy bacon and diced cheese,

but the star of this particular poem is the wine.
What am I getting at, or where am I going with this?
Nothing or nowhere, really, and that’s the whole point.
The safest poem is a poem that does not allude to anything or anyone;
a poem which no one but the writer understands.

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